Call for papers: REMHU n. 64 (april 2022), n. 65 (august 2022)

2018-05-23

The issue 64 of the Journal REMHU, April 2022, will be publisehd with a dossier about: “Human (I)mobility in front of walls and borders”. The deadline for submission of articles is on January 10, 2022.

At the end of the last century, after the fall of the Berlin Wall, it was believed at the end of the age of the walls. It seems, it was just an illusion. Today there are around 70 physical barriers on the planet, in addition to 7 under construction.

In a period marked by neoliberal deregulation, a “double circulation regime” has spread: while goods circulate with ever greater ease, there are more and more obstacles to the mobility of human beings. These are material barriers, such as walls, fences and ditches, and immaterial barriers, such as restrictive legislation (the recent “health passport”), xenophobia, discrimination and even persecution.

This “obsession” with walls affects many migrants and refugees, whose trajectory is often marked by a sequence of mobilities and immobility, violations and acts of resistance, in a constant search for new strategies to face the numerous barriers encountered along the way.

It should be noted that there is a distinction between "walls" and "borders" (Velasco, 2019): while the first ones are insurmountable and aim to prevent the encounter with the other, borders mark identity and can be open or porous, places of contact and meeting. Even with less notoriety, nowadays there are also cases of border contact and exchanges between local populations and migrants.

The dossier's objective is to deepen the growth of material and immaterial barriers, their impacts and the responses of migrants and refugees. Furthermore, it aims to analyze cases of border meeting and solidary exchange, where the logic of separating the walls is replaced by the logic of meeting.

The article (between 35 and 45 thousand characters with spaces) can be written in English, Italian, Portuguese, French or Spanish. The article should be unpublished and will be evaluated by two referees. Other information such as bibliographic standards with which all authors are obliged to comply may be found on the REMHU website or on the website of SciELO (Submissions | Revista Interdisciplinar da Mobilidade Humana (csem.org.br)).

Manuscripts should be submitted online at: http://www.csem.org.br/remhu.

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The issue 65 of the Journal REMHU, August 2022, will be published with a dossier about "Migrant women and domestic work" (the deadline for submission of articles is April 10, 2022).

Delia Dutra, María José Magliano y Mirza Aguilar (guest editors).

In the field of migration studies, and particularly on migrant women, domestic work (paid and unpaid) becomes central in the organization, maintenance and reproduction of migration projects. In different ways, domestic and care work has been a labor market in which migration - internal and - international has had a great relevance, it could be said that it has a “structural nexus” (Ariza, 2011, p. 18). The increase in the demand for domestic work and care has been solved, precariously, with the hiring of female immigrant labor among individuals (Anderson, 2000, 2001, 2007; Ariza, 2011; Cox, 2006).

In this sense, the relation between the migration of women and domestic work is historical and accounts with the renewed mechanisms of hierarchization, racialization and labor genderization, which promote the reproduction of inequalities between men and women, and also among women themselves from class membership, racial assignment and national origin. The concentration of migrant women in domestic work thus shows that the intersection of inequalities of class, gender, race and nationality is a constitutive element of the labor force. Inequalities that are expressed in the persistent invisibility, precariousness and social devaluation faced by migrant domestic workers, which deepen when these women are in a condition of migratory irregularity.

The growth of wage labor for women, the persistence of gendered and racialized division of labor, the substantial decrease in state support for social reproduction and the privatization of childcare spaces has led to a growing demand for immigrant women in domestic and care work (Chang, 2000; Hill Maher, 2003; Hondagneu - Sotelo 2011; Mattingly, 2001; Parreñas, 2001). The results of the latest reports (WIEGO, 2021; ILO, 2021) confirm a disproportionate impact on the livelihoods of working women during the Covid-19 pandemic.

Domestic work constitutes one of the sectors most affected by the crises derived from the pandemic, which represents a growing obstacle to the effective fulfillment of rights and advances that have generated both the union struggles, worker’s organizations and the adoption in some countries of the ILO convention 189. In the specific case of migrant women who are dedicated to this work, the health emergency exposed them to new situations of lack of protection and vulnerability at the same time that it exposed old forms of inequality linked to the informal and precarious conditions that characterize this work. Although in several countries domestic workers have been considered essential, migrant women workers have been excluded from protection and health systems because of their nationality.

This proposal starts from the recognition of the importance of migration studies, domestic work (whether paid or not) and gender in contemporary societies, especially in a context characterized by growing hostility towards migrant populations. In other words, a context of growing vulnerability and health emergency where the organized struggle has started to occupy more digital media seeking to reach more workers, but where the digital exclusion is accentuated and further enhances isolation and lack of access to labor rights.

The proposal is to gather articles that analyze the relation between migrant women and domestic work with various possibilities for reflection, for example, the exploitation of the workforce, violence, abuse, the commodification of affection, caring for others, isolation, loss of privacy, forms of resistance, struggle and organization, among others. Contributions that analyze the situations of vulnerability and lack of protection of migrant domestic workers, enhanced in the context of the pandemic caused by the coronavirus, are also welcome, as well as their agency capacity and the strategies of struggle and resistance that they deploy in order to transform those situations.

This dossier seeks to broaden the analytical perspectives on the subject in the most diverse contexts in which domestic work has historically been carried out by migrant women. We suggest some topics that can be deepened in the articles:

- Intersectionality and domestic work

- Sexual division of labor and migration

- Exploitation of the female workforce

- Immobility, confinement and paid work in a private house

- Affective labor and the commodification of affection

- Maternity, migration and work

- Caregivers and caregiving relations

- Domestic workers and their rights

- Migration and labor policies

- Rights of migrant women and action of international organizations and organized civil society

- Forms of resistance, struggle and organization

- Institutional racism, domestic work and migration

- Gender violence

- Feminization of poverty

The article (between 35 and 45 thousand characters with spaces) can be written in English, Italian, Portuguese, French or Spanish. The article should be unpublished and will be evaluated by two referees. Other information such as bibliographic standards with which all authors are obliged to comply may be found on the REMHU website or on the website of SciELO (Submissions | Revista Interdisciplinar da Mobilidade Humana (csem.org.br)).

Manuscripts should be submitted online at: http://www.csem.org.br/remhu.

Bibliography

ANDERSON, Bridget. Doing the dirty work? The global politics of domestic labour, Londres; Zed Books, 2000.

ANDERSON, Bridget. Reproductive Labour and Migration, Ponencia para the Sixth Metropolis Conference, Rotterdam, 2001.

ANDERSON, Bridget. “A Very Private Business: Exploring the Demand for Migrant Domestic Workers”. European Journal of Women’s Studies, v. 14, p. 247 -264, 2007.

ARIZA, Marina. “Mercados de trabajo secundarios e inmigración: el servicio doméstico en Estados Unidos”. Reis. Revista Española de Investigaciones Sociológicas, n. 136, octubre-diciembre, Madrid, Centro de Investigaciones Sociológicas, p. 3-23, 2011.

WIEGO. La crisis de la COVID-19 y la economía informal: Resumen ejecutivo. Canadá. 2021.

OIT. Avanzar en la reconstrucción con más equidad: Los derechos de las mujeres al trabajo y en el trabajo, en el centro de la recuperación de la COVID-19. Genova, 2021.